Travel

Greece Meets Figurative Language 101

Winding through Cretan mountains, exploring ancient Mycenae, feasting on local fare my writer’s mind transcribed images into figurative language. 

Hyperbole is an outrageous exaggeration to make a point.   

(GPS Map image of Cretan roads)

“In one-tenth kilometer make a sharp left. In one-tenth kilometer make a sharp right. In one-tenth kilometer make a sharp left. In one-tenth kilometer make a sharp right,” directed the calm Map App voice.

Mike expertly glided our Yaris from side to side slaloming down the White Mountain slopes of western Crete.

“She’ll repeat that a million times before we reach Paleochora,” I sighed bracing myself for yet another curve.

Alliteration is a repetition of the first consonant of several words.

(Castle of the Knights of St. John)

“Crenulation crowns the castle,” I cried and crept closer.

“Lots of lines in Lindos,” said Mike. “Let’s leave!”

Onomatopoeia is when words sound like their meaning or mimic a sound.

(Sea bass lunch at Notia Rodos on the coast of Rhodes)

Hiss! Crackle! Sputter!

“Fresh, grilled sea bass sounds delicious!” 

(Octopus non lunch at Notia Rodos on the coast of Rhodes)

Buzz! Flitter! Hum!

“Hanging, hornet infested octopus doesn’t.”

Metaphor is a comparison between two things that are not alike and replaces one word with the other.

(Lions Gate at Mycenae)

Travel is a gate to the past, to adventure, to growing together.

I’ll pass through that gate with Mike many times.

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